ArcticNet, Winnipeg, December 2016 | Fabien Mavrot

From the 5th to the 9th December the ArcticNet conference was held in Winnipeg, Manitoba (http://www.arcticnetmeetings.ca/asm2016/pages/program.php). Arctic Net is a network that aims at bringing together different stakeholders in order to share information and collaborate on research in the Arctic. A particular focus is put on the impact of climate change and human activity on the environment and its inhabitants.

photofabienmavrot

Thanks to HPI, I was able to attend to the conference and present a part of my work on muskoxen health and diseases. This conference was the largest that I have ever attended and reflected the diversity of the research supported by ArcticNet: there were oral presentations and posters from fields as diverse as physics, social science, medicine or ecology. In addition to researchers, governmental agency and industry, there were also representatives from Inuit communities. For instance, Matilde Tomaselli. my colleague from the Department of Ecosystem and Public Health co-presented the result of her participatory research on muskoxen and its value for Inuits together with Eva Kakolak and James Hanilak, two delegates from the community of Cambridge bay (Victoria Island, Nunavut). In a context of reclamation of their right to self-government and co-management of natural resources with the Canadian government, I found upstanding that Inuit community members were not only spectators but also actors during this conference.

 

As a veterinarian working with wildlife I was of course very interested in presentation related with my line of work, and I was impressed not only by the quality of the research presented at the conference but also by its originality. For example, Molly Ingemney and Sean Perry sought to assess ecological stress in young polar bears by measuring facial asymmetry on close-up pictures. In another talk, Jacqueline Verstege explained why lemmings build their nests directly on top of fox dens (and it is not because they are suicidal…)

Finally, the last evening of the conference the annual Arctic Inspiration Prizes were awarded (http://arcticjournal.ca/aip-winners-announced/). Those prizes are granted to projects proposing concrete solutions to challenges arising in a changing Arctic. The first prize was awarded to “Qarmaapik House”, which provides a safe house for children and help and support for parents during family crises. The joy of the team developing the project when they received the prize was contagious and really touching.

Altogether, what I took back from this conference is a feeling of positive energy, innovative thinking, and a strong commitment to better understand and preserve the Arctic and improve the life of people living up there. It was a very positive experience and I hope I’ll be able to attend to the International Arctic Change conference that will be held in Quebec in December 2017 and will mark the 10th anniversary of ArcticNet.

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